Metacognition Intro 1

Have you ever analyzed the strategies you use for learning new information? Do you read the information out loud several times? What about writing it down or are you one of those who make mind maps, drawings or perhaps write a song? As students we have all tried different types of learning strategies. Were they useful? Do we remember the information after a long period of time? Or do we forget most of it after the test we studied for? I am sure most of you answered “yes” to the last question. Most of us do not remember because we are not taught the proper way to learn.                                                                                                                                       Studies indicates to us the benefits and effectiveness of metacognition in education. First and foremost, “Cognition” is the quality of the human mind to capture and interpret the reality that surrounds us. Cognitive processes allow us to perceive a sunset, concentrate to read a good novel or remember unforgettable moments of our childhood.”  So how does this relate to metacognition one may ask.                                                                                                                                    Metacognition is simply put as thinking about ones thinking. It is through metacognition that an individual has the awareness and understanding of their own thought process. The main benefit of using metacognition is how it helps students become responsible and  independent learners. Being in control of your learning process is a powerful tool to succeed and improve academic achievement.                                                                                                               Studies suggests that, “metacognition “oversees” the rest of mental processes and knowledge, and allows us to have information about ourselves. Traditionally it is used in education to help learn in the classroom, strategies, memory, reading, writing, exams, self-instruction, attention and concentration problems, self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, social communication skills, etc. Lately, it has also revealed itself as a process to be taken into account in the study of clinical problems such as depression, obsessions, ADHD or schizophrenia.” Although, it’s impossible to remember all the information  studied at school, research has found effective ways and techniques for achieving meaningful learning. In this case, thinking about thinking, or using metacognitive strategies or metacognitive processes, is helpful. This concept has also been referred to as “meta-reasoning” because this process involves goal-setting, updating, monitoring, self-regulation and controlling reasoning, problem-solving and decision-making. Metacognition involves two important dimensions: metacognitive knowledge or reflection and metacognitive self-regulation.

 

Metacognitive knowledge or reflection refers to the capacity of recognizing or acknowledging one’s own:

  • Cognitive Skills: thinking about which abilities are your strengths and weaknesses: “I struggle with reading comprehension”
  • Knowledge of specific tasks-“this book I’m reading is complex”
  • Use of strategies-not only which ones do you use, but also when to use one or another: “I’ll try chunking the information and try to explain it to myself with other words”
  • Metacognitive regulationinvolves monitoring and controlling your cognitive processes. Or else, managing how is your learning going: “Is this strategy helping me understand the information? Should I try a different method?” Besides, thinking strategies to solve problems, organize ideas, plan, set goals and assess are also related to this dimension.
    • Plan approaches to plan– by analyzing the problem, selecting a strategy, organizing your thought and anticipating outcomes
    • Monitor activities during learning– examining, revising and evaluating your strategies
    • Revise outcome– assessing the results according to effectivity and efficiency criteria

 

Reference: https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/metacognition/

https://blog.cognifit.com/metacognition-improves-learning/

 

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6 thoughts on “Metacognition Intro 1

  1. Here is an article that I found to be useful when I researching metacognition and it’s direct effects on education and the classroom. Schraw, Crippen, & Hartley (2006) conduct a literature review on the latest research to that point. They focus on examining three main components of self-regulated learning: cognition, metacognition, and motivation. Metacognition shows to be the major reason for differences between scores and pre and post test judgements of score. Hopefully it’s helpful!

    Schraw, G., Crippen, K. J., & Hartley, K. (2006). Promoting self-regulation in science education: Metacognition as part of a broader perspective on learning. Research in Science Education, 36(1–2), 111–139. doi.org/10.1007/s11165-005-3917-8

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  2. Interesting piece! The use of strategies under metacognitive knowledge or reflection in my opinion is used a lot by students. Students are able to identify the different methods of learning and figure when or with what subject or course each particular method works. Paul Pintrich used exam forms as an example of how students use metacognitive knowledge and how it may motivate them to spend more time studying that particular course. he mentioned that self knowledge which includes knowledge about ones strength and weaknesses is an important aspect of metacognition. He gave an example that when a student knows he/she does better on multiple choice tests than on essay type tests has self knowledge about his/her test taking ability which is useful for the student as he/she prepares for tests.

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  3. Interesting piece! The use of strategies under metacognitive knowledge or reflection in my opinion is used a lot by students. Students are able to identify the different methods of learning and figure when or with what subject or course each particular method works. Paul Pintrich used exam forms as an example of how students use metacognitive knowledge and how it may motivate them to spend more time studying that particular course. he mentioned that self knowledge which includes knowledge about ones strength and weaknesses is an important aspect of metacognition. He gave an example that when a student knows he/she does better on multiple choice tests than on essay type tests has self knowledge about his/her test taking ability which is useful for the student as he/she prepares for tests.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1207/s15430421tip4104_3

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  4. Interesting topic and I reason with all your point. According to (Louca 2008) Metacognition’ essentially means cognition about cognition; that is, it refers to second order cognition: thoughts about thoughts, knowledge about knowledge or reflections about actions. Metacognitive experiences can have very important effects on cognitive goals or tasks, metacognitive knowledge and cognitive actions or strategies. They can lead somebody to establish new goals or revise old ones. Experiences of failure, for example, can have any of these effects. Metacognitive experiences can also affect one’s metacognitive knowledge store by adding to it, deleting from it, or revising it, as in Piaget’s model of assimilation and accommodation.

    https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=9&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwj02dCX3ZnXAhVU-mMKHXL9Bp4QFghWMAg&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cambridgescholars.com%2Fdownload%2Fsample%2F59586&usg=AOvVaw1c0GCr678pJ3F2a7AR14e6

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  5. Very Interesting topic Renee! I came across an article that talks about meta cognition and its strategies. It defines Meta cognition as “thinking about cognition,” and given that cognition generally refers to the processes of thinking, meta cognition means “thinking about thinking.” It goes on to define Meta cognitive strategies as “what people use to manage and understand their own thinking processes.”
    Another article i found, talks about components of meta cognition and meta cognitive knowledge. The three components of metacognition include – (1) Metacognitive knowledge, (2) Metacognitive regulation, and (3) Metacognitive experiences. Metacognitive knowledge on the other hand refers to the awareness individuals possess about themselves and other people as cognitive processors.

    References
    -https://psychology.iresearchnet.com/social-psychology/social-cognition/metacognition/
    -https://www.psychologynoteshq.com/metacognition/

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  6. I wrote on the same topic, and an interesting paper I found by Tanner (2012), gave a list on how teachers can promote metacognitive abilities of students. some of which are Pre-assessments: Before teaching pre-assessments should be given to students to give them an opportunity to access what they already know about the topic. Giving students practise Identifying confusions after class students should be given a flash card to write what was most confusing to them. Practises would then be given to students in areas of confusion. Pushing students to recognize conceptual change students are encouraged to think about how the concepts they are learning have changed or remained the same.
    I believe that metacognition is a skill that everyone should have by the graduation of high school because it would help with decison making; especially political descions.

    Tanner, K. D. (2012). Promoting Student Metacognition. Cell Biology Education, 11(2), 113-120. doi:10.1187/cbe.12-03-0033

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